Bat Surveys in the East Midlands

In order to gain planning permission on development sites in the East Midlands that display evidence of bats, a bat survey with a qualified ecologist will be required without exceptions.

Bat Survey Reviews

Get a Quick Quote

Step 1 of 3

Same Day Quotes
Planning Permission Focused
Simple, Hassle-free Service

Ecological Value in the East Midlands

In the East Midlands region are the counties of Rutland, Nottinghamshire, Northamptonshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire, as well as an array of recognisable cities and towns including Lincoln, Northampton, Derby, Nottingham and Leicester.

A combination of urban and rural spaces makes up the East Midlands region, displaying a mix of developed cities, populated towns and seemingly endless countryside landscapes. As a result, the region has a variety of different infrastructure, making it possible for many of the UK’s bat species to create viable habitats.

Bats Roosting in the East Midlands

Multiple factors such as the quality of the environment, number of suitable roosting locations and climate can point towards the presence of certain bat species. Looking specifically at the species of bats in the East Midlands region, bats in each county include:

Derbyshire

  • Barbastelle bat
  • Brandt’s bat
  • Brown long-eared bat
  • Daubenton’s bat
  • Leisler’s bat
  • Natterer’s bat
  • Noctule bat
  • Pipistrelle bat
  • Serotine bat
  • Whiskered bat

Leicestershire

  • Brandt’s bat
  • Brown long-eared bat
  • Daubenton’s bat
  • Natterer’s bat
  • Noctule bat
  • Pipistrelle bat
  • Whiskered bat

Lincolnshire

  • Alcathoe bat
  • Barbastelle bat
  • Bechstein’s bat
  • Brandt’s bat
  • Brown long-eared bat
  • Greater horseshoe bat
  • Grey long-eared bat
  • Lesser horseshoe bat
  • Noctule bat
  • Pipistrelle bat
  • Whiskered bat

Northamptonshire

  • Alcathoe bat
  • Barbastelle bat
  • Brandt’s bat
  • Brown long-eared bat
  • Daubenton’s bat
  • Greater horseshoe bat
  • Grey long-eared bat
  • Leisler’s bat
  • Lesser horseshoe bat
  • Natterer’s bat
  • Noctule bat
  • Pipistrelle bat
  • Serotine bat
  • Whiskered bat

Nottinghamshire

  • Brandt’s bat
  • Brown long-eared bat
  • Daubenton’s bat
  • Leisler’s bat
  • Natterer’s bat
  • Noctule bat
  • Pipistrelle bat
  • Serotine bat
  • Whiskered bat

Rutland

  • Brandt’s bat
  • Brown long-eared bat
  • Daubenton’s bat
  • Natterer’s bat
  • Noctule bat
  • Pipistrelle bat
  • Whiskered bat

According to UK law, disturbance of bats in a wide range of forms is considered illegal and likely to lead to prosecution. Between this factor and the important task of avoiding potentially costly or lengthy delays in your planning project, referring to a licensed ecologist for a bat survey on your development site if you suspect bat species are present couldn’t be more crucial.

Assessing Bat Habitats

Depending on whether or not evidence of bats has already been identified, a bat survey can start in one of two ways: either a developer has already been aware of bats on their property or has been told by their local planning authority that a bat survey is required based on a presence of bat species in the area, or the results of a broader Preliminary Ecological Appraisal (PEA) has indicated that bats are on the site. Either way, the first step in surveying bats on a development site or property would be through what is known as a Preliminary Roost Assessment (PRA).

A baseline bat survey, the Preliminary Roost Assessment is an opportunity for a qualified bat ecologist to review the site and property for more information on the bat presence. At this point, they can speak directly to the developer to understand the nature of the development and gauge whether it is likely to impact bats on the site based on their roosting location. During a thorough inspection, the ecological consultant will aim to identify evidence of bats such as carcasses, droppings, prey remains or likely roosting locations.

Immediately after the PRA, the ecologist will develop a bat survey report to detail the findings from the survey, as well as effective next steps that will enable the survey to go ahead despite the presence of bats. If, however, the ecologist determines that roosting bats could be impacted by the development or they simply don’t have enough data after the survey, a secondary assessment known as a Bat Emergence and Re-Entry Survey (BERS) will be needed.

Over the course of multiple visits during dusk and dawn, one or several bat ecologists will monitor the site for bats entering and exiting. The Bat Emergence Survey will then help to illustrate where the bats are roosting on the site and, using specialist equipment, what species of bat are on the site based on the sounds of their echolocation calls. Data from the survey can then demonstrate to the local planning authority that all necessary information has been collected, allowing for necessary measures that will enable the development to progress, leaving no reason to reject an application for planning permission.

Plan Your Bat Survey Today

As with any stage in the planning process, ensuring a high quality and reliable service is key. The same could be said for bat surveys, and turning to a service provider with the necessary experience, knowledge and expertise will eliminate any delays or stumbling blocks further down the line.

Our ecologists are suitably qualified and advanced in surveying sites and properties where bat species are present. We also have coverage across the UK, meaning that we are able to undertake bat surveys on your site in the East Midlands regardless of location. It also means that you won’t suffer any frustrating delays, and a bat survey can be booked and conducted quickly.

To make the first step in appeasing your local planning authority and progressing your submission for planning consent, speak to our team and we can supply you with a free quote before arranging a suitable time to undertake a bat survey on your site. You can call you on the number at the top of this page, fill out a quick quote form or check out the other options on our Contact page.