Bat Surveys in Yorkshire and the Humber

Do you live in Yorkshire and the Humber and are looking for an expert to carry out your bat survey? We have over 10 years of experience and we have experts in your area. Just fill in the form to get started with your free quote.

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Before a local authority grant planning permission on a plot of land with bats present, they will want assurances that the developer has a suitable plan for approaching the project in a way that doesn’t disturb or endanger them. An effective solution for developers in Yorkshire and the Humber would be to book a bat survey with our team of experienced and qualified ecological consultants.

Yorkshire bat habitats

Yorkshire and the Humber is made up of the five counties of East Riding of Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, North Yorkshire, South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire. Many notable towns and cities feature in Yorkshire and the Humber including Bradford, Cleethorpes, Doncaster, Grimsby, Halifax, Harrogate, Huddersfield, Hull, Leeds, Ripon, Scarborough, Scunthorpe, Sheffield, Wakefield and York.

Certain areas in North Yorkshire such Cleveland, Great Ayton, Guisborough, Middlesbrough, Redcar, Stokesley and Yarm qualify as sections of Yorkshire but fall outside of the region’s territory, technically making them a part of the North East. Likewise, some of the areas in Lincolnshire such as Boston, Grantham, Lincoln and Spalding fall within the East Midlands region.

Bats roost in different structures including houses, churches and bridges. Despite once being a primarily countryside region, Yorkshire and the Humber now has a mix of urban and rural areas, opening various opportunities for bats to form habitats.

Common bats in Yorkshire

Different types of bats may appear depending on the location, and even specific areas of Yorkshire and the Humber could see a variety of species.

Species of bat in each county of Yorkshire and the Humber are as follows:

East Riding of Yorkshire

  • Brandt’s bat
  • Brown long-eared bat
  • Daubenton’s bat
  • Natterer’s bat
  • Noctule bat
  • Pipistrelle bat

Lincolnshire

  • Barbastelle bat
  • Brown long-eared bat
  • Daubenton’s bat
  • Natterer’s bat
  • Noctule bat
  • Pipistrelle bat

North Yorkshire

  • Alcathoe bat
  • Brandt’s bat
  • Brown long-eared bat
  • Daubenton’s bat
  • Leisler’s bat
  • Natterer’s bat
  • Noctule bat
  • Pipistrelle bat
  • Whiskered bat

South Yorkshire

  • Brown long-eared bat
  • Daubenton’s bat
  • Natterer’s bat
  • Noctule bat
  • Pipistrelle bat
  • Whiskered bat

West Yorkshire

  • Brandt’s bat
  • Brown long-eared bat
  • Daubenton’s bat
  • Leisler’s bat
  • Natterer’s bat
  • Noctule bat
  • Pipistrelle bat
  • Whiskered bat

It is a legal offence to interfere with bats, as supported by UK legislation. If you are currently in the process of developing a property that houses any species of bat, it would be strongly advisable to refer to an ecological consultant for a bat survey.

Conducting a bat survey

The process of surveying a site for bats contains several core stages. Firstly, the ecologist will carry out a Preliminary Ecological Appraisal (PEA) to identify protected species and valuable plants. Based on the results of this assessment, the ecologist will recommend other necessary surveys. If, for example, bats or evidence of bats such as droppings or the remains of prey is found, a Preliminary Roost Assessment (PRA) will be conducted to determine the species of bats on the site as well as specific locations of where they are roosting. It is also an opportunity for the ecologist to speak directly to the developer, record details of their development project, and understand whether inhabiting bats would be affected by it.

In the final stage of the process, the ecologist will return to the site for multiple visits between May and December for what is known as a Bat Emergence and Re-Entry Survey (BERS). Held solely outside of hibernation, the purpose of a BERS is to confirm the species of bats and understand all of the entry and exit points on the plot of land. Once completed, the ecologist will assemble a report that details the survey and contains suggested next steps to benefit the developer’s planning permission application.

Assessing your site

In order to be granted planning permission on your site, you need to ensure that every possible consideration is covered. However, the only way of guaranteeing this outcome is through choosing an ecologist with a proven track record and the necessary level of expertise.

All of our ecological consultants are educated to degree-level, experienced, and proven experts in protected species surveys. As a result, we stand out as a valuable option and yearn to do all we can to get your planning permission application over the line. To learn more, contact us for a free quote via the box above or over the phone at 0808 169 6956.